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Art Deco


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Art Deco

Art Deco is a highly distinctive and influential design style that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s, characterized by its sleek, streamlined forms, geometric patterns, and luxurious materials. Originating in France, Art Deco quickly spread globally, leaving its mark on architecture, interior design, fashion, and graphic design. The style embraced modernity, celebrating the machine age and the rapid technological advancements of the era. Art Deco designs often feature bold, stylized motifs inspired by various sources, including ancient Egyptian and Mesoamerican art, Cubism, and Futurism. Symmetry and repetition are key elements, as seen in the intricate, repeating patterns adorning buildings, furniture, and decorative objects. The use of expensive materials like chrome, glass, and lacquered wood, along with vibrant colors, contributed to the style's association with luxury and sophistication. Art Deco's influence extended beyond the realm of design, permeating popular culture through its presence in Hollywood films, posters, and fashion. While the style's popularity waned after World War II, its enduring legacy continues to inspire contemporary designers, with many iconic Art Deco buildings and objects now celebrated as treasured cultural landmarks and sought-after collectibles.

Art Deco, 1920s, 1930s, geometric, streamlined

John Armstrong

431303
Art Deco

Art Deco is a distinctive visual arts design style that first emerged in France just before World War I and flourished internationally in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s before its popularity waned after World War II. It is an eclectic style that combines traditional craft motifs with Machine Age imagery and materials. The style is often characterized by rich colors, bold geometric shapes, and lavish ornamentation. Art Deco design represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress. It encompassed furniture, metalwork, clocks, glassware, screens, posters, and jewelry. The term Art Deco was coined in the 1960s to describe this distinct visual arts design style. The style took its name from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts) held in Paris in 1925. It combined modern styles with fine craftsmanship and rich materials. During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress. Art Deco was a pastiche of many different styles, sometimes contradictory, united by a desire to be modern. It featured rare and expensive materials, such as ebony and ivory, and exquisite craftsmanship. The Chrysler Building and other skyscrapers of New York built during the 1920s and 1930s are monuments of the Art Deco style.

geometric, streamlined, modern, luxury, glamour

Robert Anderson

428721
Art Deco

Art Deco, a distinctive and influential design movement that emerged in the early 20th century, is characterized by its embrace of modernity and simplicity, integrating geometric shapes, symmetrical patterns, and streamlined forms. Unlike its predecessor, Art Nouveau, which favored organic, flowing lines and floral motifs, Art Deco represented the advent of industrialization and technological progress, favoring materials such as stainless steel, aluminum, and inlaid wood to create a sense of luxury and sophistication. Originating at the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts held in Paris in 1925, Art Deco quickly permeated various aspects of design, including architecture, furniture, jewelry, and graphic design, becoming a symbol of modernity and elegance. Its influence was not confined to any one country, spreading worldwide and leaving a lasting impact on the visual landscape of cities and the design of everyday objects. The movement's aesthetic principles were deeply intertwined with the cultural and societal shifts of the interwar period, reflecting the era's optimism and the desire for progress and innovation. Art Deco's emphasis on vertical lines and aerodynamic forms can also be seen as a reflection of the contemporary fascination with speed and efficiency, mirroring the rapid advancements in transportation and urban life. Despite its decline in popularity by the end of the 1930s, Art Deco has experienced periodic revivals and continues to be celebrated for its historical significance and its enduring influence on contemporary design.

geometric shapes, streamlined forms, 1925 Paris Exhibition, modernity, luxury design, architectural style, cultural impact

Michael Thompson

428639
Art Deco

Art Deco is a distinctive style of visual arts, architecture, and design that first appeared in France just before World War I and took international prominence in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s, before declining in popularity after World War II. Characterized by rich colors, bold geometric shapes, and lavish ornamentation, Art Deco embodies a period of technological innovation, globalization, and cultural synthesis. Its aesthetic combines modernist styles with fine craftsmanship and rich materials. During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress. The style influenced all areas of design, including architecture, interior design, industrial design, fashion, jewelry, and visual arts, as well as film. Its influence was widespread, seen in the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects like radios and vacuum cleaners. Art Deco's emphasis on simplicity and symmetry was a reaction against the elaborate and often asymmetrical designs of its predecessor, Art Nouveau; however, it also borrowed from other styles of the early 20th century, such as Constructivism, Cubism, Modernism, Bauhaus, and Futurism, blending them into something new and exciting. The movement's impact on cities like New York, Miami Beach, and Paris is still evident in their iconic skylines and landmarks. The A' Design Award, recognizing the enduring influence of historical design movements, has categories that celebrate the modern interpretation of Art Deco, showcasing how contemporary designers draw inspiration from this rich stylistic heritage to create innovative works that resonate with today's aesthetic sensibilities and technological advancements.

Art Deco, geometric patterns, 1920s design, luxury and glamour, architectural style, modernist influences, cultural synthesis

Patricia Johnson

420963
Art Deco

Art Deco, a design movement originating in France during the 1920s, flourished internationally throughout the 1930s and 1940s. This style emerged as a response to the rapid industrialization and technological advancements of the era, seeking to harmonize the traditional with the modern. Art Deco is particularly known for its impact on architecture, interior design, fashion, and the decorative arts. The movement drew inspiration from various sources, such as the Machine Age, the archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt and Mesoamerica, and the avant-garde art movements of the time, including Cubism, Futurism, and Constructivism. Art Deco's eclectic nature allowed it to adapt and evolve, incorporating diverse cultural elements and materials, such as African art, Orientalism, and the streamlined forms of aerodynamic design. In architecture, Art Deco is characterized by its use of vertical lines, stepped forms, and geometric patterns, often adorned with stylized motifs and decorative elements. Iconic examples include the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building in New York City, which demonstrate the grandeur and opulence associated with the style. In interior design, Art Deco focused on creating luxurious spaces, utilizing exotic woods, rich textiles, and polished metals, as well as incorporating innovative lighting solutions. Art Deco also had a significant impact on fashion and jewelry design, as it embraced the use of bold colors, geometric patterns, and streamlined forms. The movement popularized the use of costume jewelry, allowing for the creation of affordable, yet stylish pieces that complemented the era's fashion trends. Although the popularity of Art Deco waned after World War II, it experienced a resurgence in the late 20th century and continues to influence contemporary design. Its enduring appeal lies in its ability to evoke a sense of glamour, sophistication, and progress, while maintaining a timeless quality that transcends fleeting trends.

1920s, geometric patterns, luxury, architecture, eclectic influences

Jonathan Anderson

CITATION : "Jonathan Anderson. 'Art Deco.' Design+Encyclopedia. https://design-encyclopedia.com/?E=420963 (Accessed on June 14, 2024)"

420537
Art Deco

Art Deco is a visual arts and design movement that emerged in the early 20th century, characterized by its bold geometric shapes, lavish ornamentation, and an emphasis on modernity and luxury. The movement, which originated in France, flourished internationally between the 1920s and 1930s, influencing the design of various fields, including architecture, interior design, fashion, jewelry, and industrial design. Art Deco was a response to the more organic and flowing forms of Art Nouveau, and it sought to express the optimism and rapid industrialization of the era. The name Art Deco is derived from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, a world fair held in Paris in 1925. This event showcased the works of numerous artists and designers, highlighting the new style that was emerging. The movement gained popularity and spread across the globe, with notable examples of Art Deco architecture and design found in cities such as New York, London, and Shanghai. Art Deco is characterized by its geometric patterns, including zigzags, chevrons, and stylized floral motifs. The style often features bold, contrasting colors and materials such as chrome, glass, and exotic woods. It also incorporates elements inspired by various cultures, including ancient Egyptian, Aztec, and Mayan art, as well as the avant-garde movements of the time, such as Cubism and Futurism. This fusion of diverse influences contributed to the eclectic and distinctive aesthetic of Art Deco. In architecture, Art Deco buildings are known for their streamlined forms, vertical emphasis, and decorative elements. Notable examples include the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building in New York City, as well as the Palais de Chaillot in Paris. In interior design, the style is marked by the use of luxurious materials, such as marble, lacquer, and inlaid wood, as well as geometric patterns on floors and walls. Furniture and lighting fixtures often feature sleek, streamlined designs and bold, angular shapes. The Art Deco movement began to decline in the late 1930s, as the world faced economic depression and the onset of World War II. However, the style experienced a resurgence in the 1960s and 1970s, and it continues to influence contemporary design. Today, Art Deco is celebrated for its glamour, sophistication, and enduring appeal.

Art Deco, Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs, geometric patterns, 1920s and 1930s, architecture

Matthew Robinson

257828
Art Deco

Art Deco is a highly influential design style that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s, characterized by bold geometric shapes, rich colors, and lavish ornamentation. It draws inspiration from a variety of sources, including classical antiquity, cubism, and the art nouveau movement. Art Deco is a modernist aesthetic that combines traditional craftsmanship with industrial materials and techniques to create stylized, opulent and luxurious works of art. It emphasizes sophistication and luxury and is often seen in everything from furniture to jewelry to architecture. Art Deco designers utilize a variety of materials and techniques, from precious metals and gemstones to industrial materials and modern techniques. This combination of traditional craftsmanship and modern industrial technology creates unique, opulent works of art. One of the key features of Art Deco is its emphasis on symmetry and balance, with a focus on clean lines and geometric patterns. The style often incorporates motifs such as zigzags, chevrons, sunbursts, and stepped patterns. Art Deco is highly versatile, able to fit within both traditional and contemporary design motifs. Its clean lines and vibrant colors offer designers a timeless way to create stunning visuals without being overly ornate. Art Deco has had a lasting impact on the world of design, influencing everything from architecture to fashion. It is often associated with luxury, glamour, and sophistication, and its clean lines and vibrant colors can add a timeless sophistication to any design. The style is still used today in interior design and architecture, and continues to inspire designers around the world.

influential, design style, geometric shapes, rich colors, lavish ornamentation, modernist aesthetic, traditional craftsmanship, industrial materials, luxury, symmetry, balance, clean lines, versatile, lasting impact, architecture, fashion, interior design

Mark Williams

237292
Art Deco

Art Deco is an architectural style predominantly popularized in the 1920s and 1930s. This style was characterized by its modern, geometric shapes and use of bright, vibrant colors. Many of the buildings constructed in this style feature a symmetrical frontage, with flat roofs and classical ornaments. They have a large number of windows, typically arranged in a linear pattern, and a central entrance. The materials used in Art Deco style buildings are often luxurious and expensive, including metals, marble and stone. The style was often seen as a symbol of opulence, and the architecture is often considered to be a reflection of the social and economic conditions of the time.

Modern, geometric, bright, symmetrical, luxurious.

Shelly Stone

232351
Art Deco

Art Deco is a style of architecture that emerged in the early 20th century and was popularized between the World Wars. Characterized by its modern geometric shapes, along with grandiose, ornamental details and bold colors, Art Deco architecture is often seen as a bridge between modernity and decadence. Its defining features include the use of art glass, steel, concrete, and plastic; complex geometric patterns; and intricate detailing with a nod to the avant-garde. Art Deco architecture can be found in a variety of building types, from government and commercial structures to residential homes.

Modernism, Geometry, Streamlining, Asymmetry, Ornamentation.

Michael Adams

229909
Art Deco

Art Deco is an influential modernist artistic style, featuring strong symmetrical designs characterized by luxury, glamour, and a certain grandeur. In terms of design, good Art Deco emphasizes visual clarity, balance and proportion, geometric shapes and patterns, and a focus on materials like metals, glass and mirrors, exotic woods, and lacquered surfaces. When creating Art Deco works, designers should strive to represent the era's spirit of dynamism, modernity, and optimism through the combination of modern and traditional elements.

Transition, geometric, jazz, vibrant, opulence.

Valentina Moretti

229908
Art Deco

Art Deco is a visual art, architecture and design style that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s. It is characterised by geometric shapes, bold colours, elaborate motifs and reflective surfaces. One of the key features of good Art Deco is the use of materials such as chrome, aluminium, Bakelite and lacquer. The Art Deco style combines classicism and modernism, which gives it a distinct and timeless appeal. It is also known for its intricate and complex designs. Good Art Deco also prioritises symmetry and balance, along with the careful use of symmetrical lines and shapes. These aesthetic principles, when properly utilised, create a harmonious and visually stunning result.

Style, decadence, glamour, craftsmanship, symmetry.

Valentina Moretti

229708
Art Deco

Art Deco is an ornamental style of architecture and design that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s. It is characterized by grand, geometric shapes and vibrant, sometimes exotic colors. To make your Art Deco design better, start by researching the style and its characteristics. Focus on the elements and materials that make up the style, such as metal, glass, and stone, as well as its signature geometric shapes. Consider the color palette of the style and incorporate luxurious finishes like gold, silver, and bronze. Finally, incorporate Art Deco furniture and accessories to create the desired effect.

Glamour, elegance, symmetry, geometry, color, metal.

Beatrice Colombo

229705
Art Deco

Art Deco is a distinct style of art and design that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s. The term is derived from the Exposition International des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, a large, influential exhibition held in Paris in 1925. Art Deco is characterized by bold geometric shapes, sharp lines, and a whimsical, often exotic flair. In contrast to the more organic, naturalistic shapes and forms of Art Nouveau, Art Deco is a highly stylized, angular aesthetic. Art Nouveau is often seen as a reaction against the increasing industrialization of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and its forms draw heavily from nature for inspiration. Art Deco, on the other hand, embraces modernity, often featuring combination of materials such as chrome, glass, and concrete. Art Deco emphasizes luxurious, cosmopolitan style, and incorporates motifs from classical and modern sources. Examples of Art Deco include the Chrysler Building in New York City, the Palace of the Soviets in Moscow, the Burj Al Arab Hotel in Dubai, and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis.

Glamour, sophistication, sleekness, geometry, refinement, modernity.

Angelo Greco

177093
Art Deco

Art Deco, often referred to as a style of visual art, is characterized by its geometric shapes, contrasting colors, and symmetrical balance. In anime, comics, and manga, it is frequently seen as a common artistic style used to create striking visuals. It makes use of strong linear and angular shapes to create a distinct visual, with a color palette that focuses heavily on black and white, as well as other bold and eye-catching shades of color. In addition to its use of negative space, Art Deco works often contain motifs such as suns, stars, and zig-zags, all of which contribute to the distinct look of the style.

Art Deco, Anime, Manga, Comics, Visual Art

Taro Yamada

176392
Art Deco

Art Deco is an influential visual arts design style which first appeared in France during the 1920s and was popularized internationally during the 1930s. It is characterized by geometric shapes, symmetrical designs, and a combination of modern materials with traditional craftsmanship. It is often associated with luxury, glamour, and sophistication, and features heavily in architecture and interior design. Art Deco is also often associated with the Art Nouveau movement, but the two styles differ in their emphasis on geometric shapes and linear lines.

Art Deco, Design, Architecture, Luxury, Glamour, Sophistication, Geometric, Nouveau, Materials, Craftsmanship, Linear, Lines.

Mark Lewis

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Art Deco

Art Deco is an iconic design style that has had a lasting influence on the world. This style is characterized by a combination of bold colors, geometric shapes, and luxurious ornamentation. Art Deco is a modernist aesthetic that draws from a variety of sources, including classical antiquity, cubism, Bauhaus, and the art nouveau movement. It is highly versatile, allowing designers to create stunning visuals in both traditional and contemporary design motifs. Art Deco is often seen in architecture, furniture, jewelry, and fashion, and its clean lines and vibrant colors can add a timeless sophistication to any design.

Geometric, Luxurious, Modern, Bold, Versatile

Eleonora Barbieri

77470
Art Deco

Art Deco is an iconic design style that continues to influence modern aesthetics today. It is a style that emphasizes luxury and sophistication, often combining modern and traditional elements to create a unique aesthetic. Art Deco designers utilize a variety of materials and techniques, from precious metals and gemstones to industrial materials and modern techniques. This combination of traditional craftsmanship and modern industrial technology creates unique, opulent works of art. Art Deco is a versatile style, able to fit within both traditional and contemporary design motifs. It is a timeless way to create stunning visuals that are sure to capture the attention of any audience.

Art Deco, Visual Arts, Design, Style, Luxury, Sophistication, Architecture, Furniture, Jewelry, Modernism, Craftsmanship, Industrial, Technology, Opulence, Versatile, Contemporary, Timeless.

Federica Costa

77019
Art Deco

Art Deco is an iconic style of design which continues to influence modern aesthetics today. Its combination of bold colors, geometric patterns, and lavish ornamentation has become iconic and is used to evoke a sense of luxury and sophistication. Art Deco designers sought to create a modern style which combined the traditional with the industrial, using new techniques and materials to create stunning, opulent works of art. While the origins of Art Deco are found in France during the 1920s and 1930s, its influence can be seen in many areas of design today, from furniture to architecture to fashion. Art Deco is highly versatile, able to fit both traditional and contemporary design motifs, making it a timeless way to create stunning visuals.

Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Visual Arts, Design, Geometric Patterns, Modernist Aesthetic, Luxury, Sophistication, Architecture, Furniture, Fashion, Industrial, Traditional, Colors, Zigzags, Sunbursts, Ornamentation.

Claudia Rossetti

68466
Art Deco

Art Deco is an influential visual art and design style which was popularized in the 1920s and 1930s. Characterized by bold colors and geometric shapes, the style is often seen in architecture and furniture design, as well as in fashion and jewelry. Art Deco employs a combination of modern and traditional elements, often including motifs such as zigzags, chevrons, sunbursts and stepped patterns. The movement sought to create a modern, luxurious aesthetic which drew inspiration from both traditional and industrial sources.

Art Deco, Visual Art, Design, Architecture, Furniture Design, Fashion Jewelry

Giovanna Mancini

61692
Art Deco

Art Deco is an iconic design style characterized by geometric patterns, bold colors, and lavish ornamentation. It is a style that emphasizes sophistication and luxury, and is often seen in everything from furniture to jewelry to architecture. Art Deco is highly versatile, able to fit within both traditional and contemporary design motifs. Its clean lines and vibrant colors offer designers a timeless way to create stunning visuals without being overly ornate. With a variety of materials and techniques at their disposal, designers can easily create a stunning Art Deco design sure to catch the attention of any audience.

Art Deco, Design Style, Geometric Patterns, Bold Colors, Lavish Ornamentation

Anna Lombardi

35241
Art Deco

Art Deco is an art style that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s and is characterized by strong colors, bold geometric shapes, and lavish ornamentation. It is a modernist aesthetic that combines traditional craftsmanship with industrial material and techniques to create stylized, opulent and luxurious works of art. Its influences are derived from a variety of sources, including classical antiquity, cubism, Bauhaus, and the art nouveau movement.

Art Deco, Decorative Art, Art Nouveau, Jazz Age, Aestheticism, Design Style, Modernism, Craftsmanship, Glamour, Industrialization.

Valentina Costanzo

1483
Art Deco

Art Deco is an influential visual arts design style that first appeared in France during the 1920s and 1930s. This style is characterized by a combination of rich colors, geometric shapes, and lavish ornamentation. It was heavily influenced by the modernist movement and often features motifs such as sunburst, stepped forms, and zigzag patterns. Art Deco is still used today in interior design and architecture, having a lasting impact on the world.

Art Deco, Visual Arts, Decorative Design, French Style, Modernist Movement

Giulia Esposito


Art Deco Definition
Art Deco on Design+Encyclopedia

We have 178.961 Topics and 427.322 Entries and Art Deco has 22 entries on Design+Encyclopedia. Design+Encyclopedia is a free encyclopedia, written collaboratively by designers, creators, artists, innovators and architects. Become a contributor and expand our knowledge on Art Deco today.