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Alkali-Carbonate Reaction


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250727
Alkali-Carbonate Reaction

Alkali-carbonate reaction is a chemical reaction that occurs when an alkali, such as sodium or potassium hydroxide, and a carbonate base, such as calcium carbonate, are mixed together. This reaction is exothermic, meaning that heat is released as the reaction takes place. The reaction between an alkali and a carbonate base produces a salt and carbon dioxide gas. The resulting salt is commonly known as an alkaline salt, which is different from ordinary table salt because of its alkalinity. Alkaline salts have various industrial applications, such as in water treatment, paper production, and detergents. The reaction is also used in various construction applications, such as for concrete curing and waterproofing. In the built environment, the alkali-carbonate reaction can cause concrete degradation and deterioration. When water containing carbonates, bicarbonates, and/or other salts comes into contact with concrete containing alkali hydroxides, this reaction occurs. The reaction results in the formation of a gel-like material, mainly composed of calcium carbonate, which is highly expansive. This expansive material can cause extensive cracking, leading to a decrease in structural integrity and an increase in porosity. This can cause a decrease in the durability of the concrete, resulting in a decrease in the lifespan of the structure. The alkali-carbonate reaction is not limited to concrete structures. It can also occur in other materials, such as masonry and plaster. In these materials, the reaction can cause cracking, spalling, and other forms of deterioration. To prevent the alkali-carbonate reaction, materials can be treated with coatings or sealants that prevent water and other substances from penetrating the surface. In summary, the alkali-carbonate reaction is a chemical reaction that occurs when an alkali and a carbonate base are mixed together. This reaction has various industrial and construction applications, but can also cause deterioration in concrete structures and other materials. To prevent this reaction, materials can be treated with coatings or sealants that prevent water and other substances from penetrating the surface.

alkali, carbonate, reaction, concrete degradation, industrial applications

Jason Smith

CITATION : "Jason Smith. 'Alkali-Carbonate Reaction.' Design+Encyclopedia. https://design-encyclopedia.com/?E=250727 (Accessed on July 24, 2024)"

200616
Alkali-Carbonate Reaction

The alkali-carbonate reaction is a common cause of concrete degradation and deterioration in the built environment. It is a chemical reaction that occurs when water containing carbonates, bicarbonates and/or other salts, comes into contact with concrete containing alkali hydroxides. This reaction results in the formation of a gel-like material, which is mainly composed of calcium carbonate, and is highly expansive. This expansive material can cause extensive cracking, leading to a decrease in structural integrity and an increase in porosity. This can cause a decrease in the durability of the concrete, resulting in a decrease in the life span of the structure.

Alkali-Silica Reaction, ASR, Alkali-Aggregate Reaction, AAR, Expansion, Cracking.

Charles Windsor

189367
Alkali-Carbonate Reaction

Alkali-carbonate reaction is a chemical reaction that occurs when an alkali and carbonate base are mixed together. It is an exothermic reaction, meaning that heat is released as the reaction takes place. The reaction between an alkali and a carbonate base produces a salt and carbon dioxide gas. The resulting salt is commonly known as an alkaline salt, which is different from ordinary table salt because of its alkalinity. Alkaline salts are used in various industries for a range of applications, such as water treatment, paper production, and detergents. The reaction is also used in various construction applications, such as for concrete curing and waterproofing.

Alkali-carbonate, alkaline salt, exothermic reaction, carbon dioxide.

Lauren Moore


Alkali-Carbonate Reaction Definition
Alkali-Carbonate Reaction on Design+Encyclopedia

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