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Asbestos Cement


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263475
Asbestos Cement

Asbestos cement is a composite material made of cement reinforced with asbestos fibers. It was widely used in the construction industry between the 1930s and the 1980s due to its durability, fire resistance, and low cost. Asbestos cement was commonly used in roofing, siding, pipes, and other building materials. The production of asbestos cement involves mixing cement with asbestos fibers, which are usually obtained from chrysotile asbestos. The resulting material is then molded into various shapes and sizes, depending on the intended use. Asbestos cement products are known for their strength, durability, and resistance to fire, water, and chemicals. However, the use of asbestos cement has been linked to serious health risks. When asbestos fibers are inhaled, they can cause lung cancer, mesothelioma, and other respiratory diseases. Asbestos cement products can release fibers into the air when they are drilled, sawed, or otherwise disturbed. As a result, many countries have banned the use of asbestos cement, and it is no longer produced in most parts of the world. Despite its health risks, asbestos cement remains a common material in many older buildings. Asbestos cement products that are in good condition and not disturbed are generally considered safe. However, if asbestos cement products need to be removed or repaired, it should be done by a professional who is trained in handling asbestos safely.

composite material, construction industry, durability, fire resistance, health risks

Joshua Wilson

253558
Asbestos Cement

Asbestos cement, also known as AC sheeting, is a composite material made up of cement and asbestos fibers. It is commonly used in construction for its durability, fire resistance, and insulation properties. Asbestos cement was widely used in the mid-20th century for roofing, cladding, and pipes due to its low cost and ease of installation. However, the use of asbestos in construction materials has been banned in many countries due to the health risks associated with exposure to asbestos fibers. Asbestos cement is composed of a mixture of chrysotile asbestos fibers and Portland cement. The fibers are evenly distributed throughout the cement matrix, providing strength and durability to the material. Asbestos cement is resistant to fire, rot, and corrosion, making it a popular choice for roofing and cladding in industrial and commercial buildings. However, the use of asbestos cement poses a serious health risk to workers and residents who may be exposed to airborne asbestos fibers. Asbestos fibers can cause lung cancer, mesothelioma, and other respiratory diseases when inhaled. Asbestos cement products that are in good condition and not disturbed are generally considered safe, but when the material is damaged or deteriorating, it can release asbestos fibers into the air. In conclusion, asbestos cement is a composite material made up of cement and asbestos fibers that was widely used in construction for its durability, fire resistance, and insulation properties. However, due to the health risks associated with exposure to asbestos fibers, the use of asbestos in construction materials has been banned in many countries. Asbestos cement products that are in good condition and not disturbed are generally considered safe, but caution should be taken when handling or removing damaged or deteriorating asbestos cement products.

Asbestos, Cement, Composite Material, Health Risk, Durability

Daniel White

189988
Asbestos Cement

Asbestos Cement, also known as Transite, is a building material made up of cement and asbestos fibers. It is a mixture of the inorganic mineral fiber asbestos and cementitious material, typically Portland Cement. It is used for cladding, roofing and fireproofing, as well as construction applications such as soundproofing and insulation. It is highly durable and resistant to fire and corrosion, but it is also known to be hazardous to health due to the asbestos fibers present.

Asbestos Cement asbestos, cement, Transite.

Lauren Moore

CITATION : "Lauren Moore. 'Asbestos Cement.' Design+Encyclopedia. https://design-encyclopedia.com/?E=189988 (Accessed on February 29, 2024)"


Asbestos Cement Definition
Asbestos Cement on Design+Encyclopedia

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